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Anything But Zombies


Almost a year ago, I was approached by Gerald Rice and asked if I’d like to be in an anthology. I hesitated. At the time he didn’t have a lot of details but he managed to convince me that it would work out and everyone would leave happy. He told me who is was for and I did a little digging. Then I had to submit a writing sample (!) and then actually write it. ON A DEADLINE.


Deadline. really?

Deadline. really?


Oh boy.


Then a W-9 arrived, and then a contract,  and despite getting sick and work issues, and travelling and getting stuck on the actual story, and trying to back out (he refused my resignation) – I submitted it.


They were so serious about this, there was a release date already planned. No pressure.


I even managed to spell “submission” wrong in the subject line.


Submitting something to editors you know or friends is completely different that submitting to Editors at Big Five Imprints. There is so much self-doubt surrounding your own grammar, style, story, pacing it’s impressive anyone submits anything at all.


I need to say “submits” a few more times.


It was accepted with a few editor’s notes for clarification. Said the editor “Just a few typos (I can tell you dictated this story at least in part).”


Ha – yeah. Dictated.


*shifty eyes*


But the part that got me – it was accepted.


What?

What?


It was one of the longest short stories I’d ever written, it was coherent, they liked it. I got paid. My name is on the cover of a book.


Achievement Unlocked: Name on Cover

Achievement Unlocked: Name on Cover


Now it’s available for everyone to read. Anything but Zombies dropped yesterday with all of the fanfare I could muster without annoying the friends and followers. It’s a Kindle-only edition (let’s push for print!), and available through Amazon and the Simon and Schuster websites.


It already has a 5-star review! It’s been reviewed in the local rag, Metro Times, and no one hates it on Goodreads, so all in all, a good first day. column.


My story, “Crew Chief of the Damned” is nestled in there at #5, but of course I encourage you to read everything at least twice. This will also be the second anthology in which I’ve appeared with Jeff Strand, so he’s become my spirit animal.


I want to do more of these. I want to have collections of my stories from other anthologies and write forwards that say “when Kirby McCauley asked me to be in his anthology, I hesitated.”


Of course, if Kirby McCauley asked me to be in anything, I’d freak out just a little because, you know, he’s dead, but I think I’d still say yes.




CSI:Cyber, or Hatewatching is the New Black


I hatewatch CSI:Cyber and I don’t care who knows about it.


I’m a junkie when it comes to procedurals. Maybe it comes from my dad being a cop or my skewed sense of righting a wrong or unraveling a mystery I actually don’t have to solve. I like seeing how things work and walking back a crime. As a writer, I’m an armchair forensic pathologist. I know my petechial hemorrhaging from my parietal lobe.


Simple detective series like Murder She Wrote, Matlock and In The Heat of The Night have led to Law and Order, NCIS, and of course, CSI: Crime Scene Investigation and they all helped mold my admittedly simple view of what it takes to solve crimes in entertaining and often bloody ways.


That’s why I was a little excited to see the CSI: Cyber announcement. I’ve mostly liked the CSI franchise, even if I didn’t always like the characters, and I liked the crime solving, because it uses inventive visuals and witty banter. The new series would have a lot more computers, and I’ve had a computer since I was 16. Clearly I could potentially relate to this series.


Plus, I’m a 21st Century girl. I know how stuff works.


It was touted as this special unit solving crimes that “start in the mind, live online, and play out in the real world.”


Honestly, this could describe a lot of meat (real) world events, as the Internet is where most people live in a broad sense. So, okay. Let’s give this a shot.


The soft launch was last season on “CSI: Crime Scene Investigations” (which I guess has been shortened to CSI:LV), and while I wasn’t entirely sure how a a premise like that could extend to an entire series, I was still willing to give it a shot.


I mean, crime procedurals.


It was hitting all of my ISTJ buttons. So I tuned in to watch the official 1st Episode, titled, “Kidnapping 2.0”, and settled back to see this fancy woman-lead team break some track balls and kick some cache.


They"ve all just watched the Pilot and they"re feeling a little sick.  Photo: Michael Yarish/CBS ©2015 CBS Broadcasting, Inc. All Rights Reserved

They’ve all just watched the Pilot and they’re feeling a little sick.
Photo: Michael Yarish/CBS ©2015 CBS Broadcasting, Inc. All Rights Reserved


It didn’t happen. From the gate it turned the unbelievable into a scare-mongering artform.


A recap: bad people are hacking into baby monitors (just go with it) and then breaking into homes to auction off the babies. While still in the home. You know, instead of hacking into monitors, collecting the info, stealing the baby and *then* auctioning it off. That’s how I would have done it, but I’m not a criminal genius who likes to make things more difficult than they have to be. What were they afraid of – getting a bum baby they couldn’t sell? Not to spoil the climatic ending, but did you see who they handed off the baby to? When you lay down the groundwork and then leave the culmination of your evil plans to a few biker/redneck/meth heads, chances are you won’t be in the evil genius business very long.


Anyway, while we’re looking for kidnapped babies on the interwebs, we’re also learning about our ensemble cast, which means EVERYONE has three minutes to be front and center and memorable. This also means everyone is reduced to pithy lines to prove how cool and integral they are to the team. There are better ways to do this over a few episodes, but I don’t write for CBS so what do I know.


We also learn terms like “Black Hat”, “White Hat”, “Deep Web”, “Social Media”, “Code”, by which I mean they’re repeated so many times you could conceivably create a drinking game and be dead of alcohol poisoning before the second commercial break.


Since the pilot of CSI: Cyber, I have hatewatched this show every week often in the company of my friend PJ. We fulfill our need via Facebook and it’s just like being in the same room except we can relive the special moments later. We don’t watch in the hopes it will get better, because we both know it’s not ever going to get better. It can’t, not with the current writing staff and storylines. You certainly couldn’t consider this show informative because there’s so much misinformation about how things really work. They have these black information cards in every episode for things like “phishing”, “location services”, and “crowd sourcing” that are so wildly inaccurate, I now wonder if the cards are there to tell us, the Audience, these are how the terms are being used and understood in that instance, so never mind about the actual definitions.


So why do we waste our time on such a terrible show? I don’t know, the unintentional comedic factor, perhaps?  The earnest delivery of technical terms used incorrectly, the plot jumps, inconsistent character development, all to show how technology is dangerous but thank Gods there’s a woman in charge to fight it?


We’ll talk about that later.


It’s clear the target audience is the 55+ demographic and unfortunately, by 10PM on Wednesday Night, they’ve already gone to bed. Ageism, someone is screaming, but if you see the storylines, no one in the coveted 18-49 group believes any of this nonsense is possible. I guess because as a whole we understand how computers and technology work.


The writers of CSI: Cyber don’t. The plot lines sound like something conceived in focus group/pitch sessions run by the tin-foil hat (SILVER HAT – take a drink!) club of AARP. And while someone will undoubtedly come along and point to isolated cases of baby monitor fueled auctions, ride-share serial killers, and pyromania via networked printer, the idea that there is a master criminal hacker out there using their computers to target very specific people in very over-complicated plans is beyond far-fetched.


On top of that, your perpetrator is usually not a master criminal, but some jilted lover or grief-stricken parent looking to make a soft point about something so specific, the fact they went to the trouble of involving the Internet seems short-sighted and over-complicated. Like this show.


It’s always the guy you least suspect, right?


Yeah, no. It’s exactly they guy you suspect but you need another 38 minutes of painful set up, mis-direction, and arresting the wrong people (a lot) to showcase how completely incompetent this hand-picked team is.


"Talk into my good ear, honey - it ain"t been right since I fell through the ice to save my brother." Photo: Monty Brinton/CBS ©2014 CBS Broadcasting, Inc. All Rights Reserved

“Talk into my good ear, honey – it ain’t been right since I fell through the ice to save my brother.”
Photo: Monty Brinton/CBS ©2014 CBS Broadcasting, Inc. All Rights Reserved


And if that was the goal of CBS, then well-done.


I haven’t figured out what part of this show bugs me more – the lack of actual science in the “cyber” part of the show or the fact that for a psychologist, Special Agent Avery Ryan can’t tell the difference between a multiple murder and a serial murder (to date, there have been no actual serial murders in this show, but let’s throw around the phrase anyway because ratings).


"Am I Sciencing, now?" Photo: Michael Yarish/CBS ©2015 CBS Broadcasting, Inc. All Rights Reserved

“Am I Sciencing, now?”
Photo: Michael Yarish/CBS ©2015 CBS Broadcasting, Inc. All Rights Reserved


Because CSI: Cyber is set up to be nearly impenetrable with the faux terms, bickering techs, and absolutely clueless Team Leads, it’s painted itself into a corner and forgotten the fun part of procedurals – the investigation (sloppy) and the reveal (expected and a little lazy).


This show was essentially set up to fail and I’ve got a few more posts to blog-examine why. I’ve been really enjoying diving deep into the dark webs of this show and peeling back the necrotic layers of a series that’s essentially a visual handbook on how not to write episodic television.




Tags:

CSI:Cyber, or Hatewatching is the New Black


I hatewatch CSI:Cyber and I don’t care who knows about it.


I’m a junkie when it comes to procedurals. Maybe it comes from my dad being a cop or my skewed sense of righting a wrong or unraveling a mystery I actually don’t have to solve. I like seeing how things work and walking back a crime. As a writer, I’m an armchair forensic pathologist. I know my petechial hemorrhaging from my parietal lobe.


Simple detective series like “Murder She Wrote”, “Matlock” and In The Heat of The Night” have led to “Law and Order” “NCIS” and of course, “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation” and they all helped mold my admittedly simple view of what it takes to solve crimes in entertaining and often bloody ways.


That’s why I was a little excited to see the CSI: Cyber announcement. I’ve mostly liked the CSI franchise, even if I didn’t always like the characters, and I liked the crime solving.  because it use inventive visuals and witty banter. The new series would have a lot more computers, and I’ve had a computer since I was 16. Clearly I could potentially relate to this series.


Plus, I’m a 21st Century girl. I know how stuff works.


It was touted as this special unit solving crimes that “start in the mind, live online, and play out in the real world.”


Honestly, this could describe a lot of meat (real) world events, as the Internet is where most people live in a broad sense. So, okay. Let’s give this a shot.


The soft launch was last season on “CSI: Crime Scene Investigations” (which I guess has been shortened to CSI:LV), and while I wasn’t entirely sure how a a premise like that could extend to an entire series, I was still willing to give it a shot.


I mean, crime procedurals.


It was hitting all of my ISTJ buttons. So I tuned in to watch the official 1st Episode, titled, “Kidnapping 2.0”, and settle back to see this fancy woman-lead team break some track balls and kick some cache.


They"ve all just watched the Pilot and they"re feeling a little sick.  Photo: Michael Yarish/CBS ©2015 CBS Broadcasting, Inc. All Rights Reserved

They’ve all just watched the Pilot and they’re feeling a little sick.
Photo: Michael Yarish/CBS ©2015 CBS Broadcasting, Inc. All Rights Reserved


It didn’t happen. From the gate it turned the unbelievable into a scare-mongering artform.


A recap: bad people are hacking into baby monitors (just go with it) and then breaking into homes to auction off the babies. You know, instead of hacking into monitors, collecting the info, stealing the baby and *then* auctioning it off. That’s how I would have done it, but I’m not a criminal genius who like to make things more difficult than they have to be. What were they afraid of – getting a bum baby and couldn’t sell it? Not to spoil the climatic ending, but did you see who handed off the baby to? When you lay down the groundwork and then leave the culmination of your evil plans to a few biker/redneck/meth heads, chances are you won’t be in the evil genius business very long.


Anyway, while we’re looking for kidnapped babies on the interwebs, we’re also learning about our ensemble cast, which means EVERYONE has three minutes to be front and center and memorable. This also means everyone is reduced to pithy lines to prove how cool and integral they are to the team. There are better ways to do this over a few episodes, but I don’t write for CBS so what do I know.


We also learn terms like “Black Hat”, “White Hat”, “Deep Web”, “Social Media”, “Code”, by which I mean they’re repeated so many times you could conceivably create a drinking game and be dead of alcohol poisoning before the second commercial break.


Since the pilot of CSI: Cyber, I have hatewatched this show every week often in the company of my friend PJ. We fulfill our need via Facebook and it’s just like being in the same room except we can relive the special moments later. We don’t watch in the hopes it will get better, because we both know it’s not ever going to get better. It can’t, not with the current writing staff and storylines. You certainly couldn’t consider this show informative because there’s so much misinformation about how things really work. They have these black information cards in every episode for things like “phishing”, “location services”, and “crowd sourcing” that are so wildly inaccurate, I now wonder if the cards are there to tell us, the Audience, these are how the terms are being used and understood, so never mind about the actual definitions.


So why do we waste our time on such a terrible show? I don’t know, the unintentional comedic factor, perhaps?  The earnest delivery of technical terms used incorrectly, the plot jumps, inconsistent character development, all to show how technology is dangerous but thank god there’s a woman in charge to fight it?


We’ll talk about that later.


It’s clear the target audience is the 55+ demographic and unfortunately, by 10PM on Wednesday Night, they’ve already gone to bed. Ageism, someone is screaming, but if you see the storylines, no one in the coveted 18-49 group believes any of this nonsense is possible. I guess because as a whole we understand how computers and technology work.


The writers of CSI: Cyber don’t. The plot lines sound like something conceived in focus group/pitch sessions run by the tin-foil hat (SILVER HAT – take a drink!) club of AARP. And while someone will undoubtedly come along and point to isolated cases of baby monitor fueled auctions, ride-share serial killers, and pyromania via networked printer, the idea that there is a master criminal hacker out there using their computers to target very specific people in very over-complicated plans is beyond far-fetched.


On top of that, your perpetrator is usually not a master criminal, but some jilted lover or grief-stricken parent looking to make a soft point about something so specific, the fact they went to the trouble of involving the Internet seems short-sighted and over-complicated. Like this show.


It’s always the guy you least suspect, right?


Yeah, no. It’s exactly they guy you suspect but you need another 38 minutes of painful set up, mis-direction, and arresting the wrong people (a lot) to showcase how completely incompetent this hand-picked team is.


And if that was the goal of CBS, then well-done.


I haven’t figured out what part of this show bugs me more – the lack of actual science in the “cyber” part of the show or the fact that for a psychologist, Special Agent Avery Ryan can’t tell the difference between a multiple murder and a serial murder (to date, there have been no actual serial murders in this show, but let’s throw around the phrase anyway because ratings).


Because CSI: Cyber is set up to be nearly impenetrable with the faux terms, bickering techs, and absolutely clueless Team Leads, it’s painted itself into a corner and forgotten the fun part of procedurals – the investigation (sloppy) and the reveal (expected and a little lazy).


This show was essentially set up to fail and I’ve got a few more posts to blog-examine why. I’ve been really enjoying diving deep into the dark webs of this show and peeling back the necrotic layers of a series that’s essentially a visual handbook on how not to write episodic television.




Tags:


(if this looks familiar, it’s because I post a version of it every year)


It was 19 years ago today that Douglas Stormer married MontiLee Points at the Silver Bell Wedding Chapel in Las Vegas, Nevada.


You’d never believe Las Vegas Blvd was roaring behind the photographer


We had saved up our money for over a year, planned two and a half days on the train, three days in Vegas and one week in Santa Rosa, CA. We had our license, our chapel, and my mom.


My dress never arrived, but this is Vegas and you can get anything if you have the cash. We rented our spiffy outfits from San Francisco Sally’s, a wedding rental joint on LVB. For one day (and $175.00), I got to be a princess.


The dry-cleaner accidentally sent my dress to Detroit, ME (who knew, right?), which resulted in me renting this little number


Inside the chapel reception area, there was another couple –  a tall, leggy Blonde with a shorter, balding gentleman. We all exchanged nervous, embarrassed looks. She wore a white mini-dress, that was summery without being slutty and she gushed over my gown. I said she looked nice too, and she told me that this was all so sudden for her, but sometimes you just know when it’s right. I nodded. She said she couldn’t stop throwing up, she was so excited. I took a small step back. There was a $500.00 deposit on the dress that I couldn’t afford to pay should something happen to it.


There were flowers waiting for us from Doug’s brother Jere. It was like his family was there with us, too.


When we arrived, we were ushered into the back area to prepare – my dress, my shoes, my veil, and my mom. It was like my prom all over again – new underwear, new stockings, a garter that matched the dress that neglected to follow us from Detroit but would work okay with this one. My mom helped me get zipped and primped, pinned the veil in place, and she cried a little. That got me started and we were bawling before we made it to the chapel doors.


I still have what’s left of those roses in a box in the garage.


There is always that moment before the service, when you serious begin to think about what you’re doing. What if this isn’t the one? What if I can’t live up to what he needs? What if…? What if…? Then the music starts and all you can think of is putting one foot in front of the other, and


goodness was it always this warm in here …

that arrangement looks like we just won the Belmont Stakes …

if every man would wear a tux every day, dating would become obsolete …

the earth is spinning without me …


getting down the aisle without tripping on the dress. The event was being video taped, so whatever stupid move I pulled would be recorded forever and ever, played back for family and friends and blackmailers for eternity.


Doug whispered to me, “Don’t cry – we’re happy,” and we were. We are. As the manly men on the TV say after big wins in sports, “our eyes were moist.”


We looked and felt like kids playing dress up

We looked and felt like kids playing dress up


I made it down the aisle without tripping or throwing up or passing out. Mom gave me away, witnessing her eldest daughter’s wedding. The minister made my name sound exotic, and I had never been so happy to be saddled with it. There could be no other name that rolled off his tongue like warm honey.


Only good looking people are allowed in my family


We did it. Said our “I Do’s” witnessed before my mom and the minister, and whichever god wasn’t dozing in the warm April sun.


Afterwards there were pictures, and the photographer complained (half-heartedly) non-stop about my train. Us girls and our trains were going to be the death of him, he said.


Never has a Hummel figurine been more adorable


Because everything is a gimmick in Vegas, as thanks for choosing the Silver Bell Wedding Chapel in Las Vegas Nevada, we were given two etched champagne flutes – one says Bride and one says Groom – and a chilled bottle of Champagne. We still drink from them every year.


The chapel sent the negatives of our photos a year later, claiming that there was a storage issue and we could either keep them or toss them. I’m glad we kept the proofs because they only managed to send us the negatives of 7 of our photos – the other 5 are of the couple that was married behind us.


I hope they are as happy as we are.


Somewhere someone has the 11×15 of this


Nineteen years was the ceiling reached by my parents’ marriage, though really it was over much sooner. It doesn’t always work out, and I’m blessed they kept it civil for the sake of their kids. I love them both for that. Douglas and I are both children of divorce, and we were old enough to see why our parents’ couldn’t work it out – and probably in both cases it was for the best.


We’re also our own people and we know we aren’t our parents.


The Stormer Ark of the Covenant - holder of the VHS record of Happy Weeps

The Stormer Ark of the Covenant
- holder of the VHS record of Happy Weeps


This union isn’t perfect, but it wasn’t meant to be, because perfection is complacency, and I appreciate something more when I have to work for it. I may not always like the work, but the rewards like a smile or a laugh or a soft sigh more than make up for the callouses.


We take it day by day and appreciate everything we’re given, because not everyone is as fortunate. Love is loss and sorrow and saying hello to a face that has shown you tears and smiles and anger and joy and fear, and being certain the day you’d have to say that final goodbye would break you  into a million pieces.


Incidents of War Merging our two passions - The Civil War for him, and great photos of me for me Photo taken at Gibson"s Photographic Gallery, Gettysburg, PA

Incidents of War
Merging our two passions – The Civil War for him, and great photos of me.
Photo taken at Gibson’s Photographic Gallery, Gettysburg, PA 


Nineteen years, and counting.




Movie Review: Housebound (2014)


Housebound

2014

Starring: Morgana O’Reilly, Rima Te Wiata, Glen-Paul Waru, Ross Harper, Ryan Lampp

Writer/Director: Gerard Johnstone

Produced by: Semi-Professional

Distributor: XLrator Media (2014) (USA) (Theatrical)

(info courtesy of imdb)


I am not a huge fan of horror-comedy (or comedy horror, depending on ratio). I like my horror scary, with minimal sex and the screaming dialed down to about a 4. I know this puts me in the minority because I put a silly little thing like story about body count and the consistency of scattered brain matter, but it’s what makes me a special snowflake.


I found Housebound through a Netflix recommendation, right there in the big ol’ banner when I pulled up the app on my phone, so if the producers and marketing people are reading, that was money very well spent.


Housebound tells the story of miscreant, Kylie (Morgana O’Reilly), put under house arrest because she’s a screw up. As she can’t seem to stay out of trouble and her criminal antics apparently don’t warrant jail time, she’s sentenced to several months of home detention under the care and watchful eye of Miriam (Rima Te Wiata), her mother. As Kylie is forced to endure the home she left years ago and her mother’s insistence the place is haunted initially causes tension, but before too long, Kylie – acting as the skeptical audience – begins to experience the house as she uncovers its past as entwined with hers. Add in a helpful parole-type officer, Amos (Glen Paul Raru) (I know next to nothing about the criminal justice system in New Zealand), who’s also an amateur paranormal investigator, and you have the makings of a ghost hunt that feels sincere and authentic in the sense that no one knows what they’re doing. More stuff happens, but as I went into this movie absolutely cold, you should just let this great story unfold on its own.


There are lots of what seem like throwaway lines in this film and that’s really what makes it work. Casual conversation doesn’t feel forced, information is meted out judiciously and in its own time, and nothing feels forced or dumped. The overall originality and pacing from twist to turn is invigorating. There’s also scene with a Teddy Ruxpin-like bear that was the creepiest thing I’ve seen in a long time.


I keep coming back to Kylie’s character, because had it been played any other way, this movie would not have worked as well, and that’s a grand credit to Morgana O’Reilly. Kylie isn’t the most likeable of protagonists – she’s inconsiderate, a slob, and downright mean – but never over the top. She’s human – someone in a lousy situation that only getting worse by degrees. There’s no screaming or throwing things, just a silent seething contempt for just about everything. Her performance makes this movie so much less like the usual isolated/haunted house/screaming nonsense and infinitely more fun.


I spent the first half of Housebound actively disliking Kylie and waited with glee to see Bad Things Happen. Unlike a lot of female-lead driven movies, she grows as a character. There was a scene where her stepfather, played by Ross Harper, is trying to include her in a simple repair activity clearly wanting to connect on some level with this angry creature he has to live with. She blows him off and you find yourself saying to the camera – “Kylie, don’t be a sh*t” – and you think she hears you because she turns around and participates. She never becomes the kind of person you’d leave your wallet with, and that’s completely fair, but you stop hating her and you’re secretly excited this movie won’t become a typical woman in peril horror movie.


(I can’t talk about the other awesome actors in this because I don’t want to spoil your fun, but generous hat tip to Ryan Lampp!)


If you care about this sort of thing, it get a rating of 96% on Rotten Tomatoes.


It’s streaming on Netflix right now.



 


 


Wow Factor – I love being surprised by hidden gems.

Wander Lust – None – no bathroom, no soda refills, I didn’t even knit while I watched.

Rewind – To talk about them would spoil them, but that 30-second rewind on Netflix came in handy more than once

Recommend – Yes, to lovers of well-written, well-paced movies fun scares that pull no punches

Movie Math – 100 Feet + (Spoiler) = Housebound

Personal Movie rating (scale of 1-5 with one being Abysmal and 5 being “Start A religion”) – 4.5




Tags:

Gah – now I need content!


Hello, you!


Since you’re likely here from the Flint Horror Collective, let me start by saying thanks for the interest, and I really do look forward to seeing your faces in April.


Photo Credit @Kaha"s Soup

Photo Credit @Kaha’s Soup


You’re probably looking for some samples to read so you can get an idea of what I write. In the sidebar, there is a link, Stories to Read With Your Eyes (which I’ve also linked here because redundancy), and there are previously published short stories  in their entirety for you to read.


I like writing short stories because like so many events in our lives, the things that impact us the greatest are the short in between bits that occur while we’re enduring the larger life arcs.


Come along, me


 


My inspiration is the news, history, clips of overheard conversation – in other words, Life. Life inspires me to write horror, and not because it’s boring or not horrific enough. I was asked once why I would want to write bad things happening to people – which is the polite way to ask, “what is wrong with you”.


Now"s the time on Sprockets when we dance

Now’s the time on Sprockets when we dance


There’s nothing wrong with me that I want to fix. Having an imagination that can augment my reality with that of things that go bump in the night really is the best thing ever.


20140917_092313


Aside from writing, I also knit, crochet and watch a lot of movies. The bento boxes you see in previous posts are my way of eating healthy – the plastic babies are just fun. I love audiobooks, and I actually read more urban fantasy and medical thrillers (think Butcher and Reichs) than horror. We all have our thing.


harold whut

There is nothing wrong with Harold.


 


I’m also a huge Person of Interest fan


You can ask me almost anything in the comments, and while I don’t friend everyone on Facebook, you’re free to follow me there or on Twitter.


See you on April 11!


Flint Horror Collective Presents:

Beyond the Book

A Celebration of Horror Authors

Saturday, April 11

at 2:00pm – 4:00pm

Flint Public Library

1026 E Kearsley St, Flint, Michigan 48503


This is a FREE event with light snacks and refreshments.





#40DaysofBento

#40DaysOfBento Day #17

Just lunch today


Udon noodles, salmon teriyaki, corn croquettes, broccoli


#40DaysOfBento  Day #17

#40DaysOfBento
Day #17


#40DaysOfBento  Day #17

#40DaysOfBento
Day #17


#40DaysOfBento  Day #17

#40DaysOfBento
Day #17


#40DaysOfBento  Day #17

#40DaysOfBento
Day #17


#40DaysOfBento  Day #17

#40DaysOfBento
Day #17


What am I doing?


For those just joining, this is my challenge for the next 40 days (Ash Wednesday until Easter). I document these (M-F) days leading up by making healthy lunches every day. You’ll know what day we’re on by how many Plastic Babies are present.


You can also follow me on Instagram and tumblr.




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